How To: Use Excel documents during a Divorce

divorceThere are few events in life that can cause significant personal change. Marriage, birth and death are some of them. Divorce is another. For information and/or a free divorce attorney consultation in Seattle contact us now.

As an experienced divorce law firm, we understand the process of divorce can be frustrating, expensive, emotional, and painful. However, there are tools to lessen the level of difficulty. Using an Excel spreadsheet can assist in keeping the process objective, and assist with the actual division of property and debts.

Aside from breaking up an emotional and personal union, a divorce also involves the actual separation of property and debts. A couple will need to make decisions about who gets what, unless they would like the Court to intervene and make the decisions on their behalf. If both parties try to be objective, a detailed spreadsheet approach can make it far easier to manage the process. Each divorce case is decided on an individual basis and, contrary to what most people believe, it is not always a 50/50 division.

Washington State requires property and debts to be “just and equitably” divided. In some instances, a “just and equitable” division of property and debts is not 50/50.

Detailing and listing every asset and debt on an Excel spreadsheet can be helpful. It might be good to do two files individually and then have an attorney combine the two. By using an Excel file, the frustrating, expensive, emotional, and painful process of divorce can proceed more smoothly.

The following items should be included:

• Investments and Bank Account Information
• IRA’s, 401(k’s), Pensions, Deferred Compensation Accounts, Valuable Sick Leave
• Property or Real Estate
• All Vehicles, including boats and RV’s
• Home Furnishings and Décor such as Artwork or Antiques of Significant Value
• Jewelry
• Debts–Separate and Joint
• Debts–Pre Marriage and Post Separation

According to Paul F. Eagle, of Eagle Law Offices, P.S., a family law attorney in Seattle, “The process of divorce can be overwhelming and confusing. It helps to list out all your assets in an organized fashion to ensure that no items or information missed, and that the process goes as smooth as possible.”

With an inventory complete, then begins the discussion of how to divide everything on record. It can be difficult to list out and separate memories and items purchased during a marriage; however, it is important to be accurate and honest in order to move forward. The implementation of an Excel spreadsheet for asset and debt distribution can help make the process of divorce and can cut down on cost, petty arguments and stress.

Divorce is difficult, but when an objective and organized approach is taken– like using an Excel spreadsheet–it can be controlled and finished efficiently allowing each party to positively move on and complete the divorce.  For a free divorce attorney consultation in Seattle, contact us now.

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